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This blog post was written by Alex Fergus. Alex is an ISSN Sports Nutrition Specialist, Fitness Professional and certified Superhuman Coach who continues to expand his knowledge base and help people across the world with their health and wellness. Alex is recognized as the National Record Holder in Powerlifting and Indoor Rowing and has earned the title of the Australian National Natural Bodybuilding Champion. Having worked as a health coach and personal trainer for over a decade, Alex now researches all things health and wellness and shares his findings on this blog. Learn more about Alex's Credentials HERE.

Appetite regulation: One of the first things people often notice when they’re in ketosis is that they’re no longer hungry all the time. In fact, research has shown that being in ketosis suppresses appetite. One study looked at people who lost weight by following a ketogenic diet for eight weeks and then reintroduced small amounts of carbs. The researchers reported that levels of ghrelin (the “hunger hormone”) were suppressed in those who remained in ketosis, whereas those who were no longer in ketosis had higher ghrelin levels.
It may seem unusual that a diet filled with fats could be a positive for your heart, but that's exactly what Dr. Phinney suggests. "In the one-year study, 22 of 26 cardiovascular risk factors significantly improved. Most notably, these patients experienced a mean fasting triglyceride reduction of 24 percent, an 18 percent increase in good HDL cholesterol, and significant reductions in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure." For all of these findings, Dr. Phinney notes that research into the benefits of keto is still in its earliest stages. "The fact is, there is not yet any long-term, peer-reviewed data that connects some of these improvements to nutritional ketosis," he says. Read more about the 11 hidden dangers of the keto diet.

Fat accumulation in the liver is commonly associated with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. In serious cases, fatty liver disease can damage the liver. Doctors test for the condition by measuring levels of liver enzymes using blood tests. "These enzymes were significantly reduced after one year in the clinical patients, indicating less risk of developing fatty liver disease," Dr. Phinney says of the diabetes study. If you've been told you're at risk for fatty liver, you may want to give this diet plan a try. Before you embark on any new eating plan, arm yourself with knowledge. You'll want to read this: 11 hidden dangers of the keto diet.

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