Getting into ketosis on a ketogenic diet is not a black or white thing. It’s not like you’re either in ketosis or out of ketosis. Instead, you can achieve different degrees of ketosis. The definition of “optimal” ketosis my vary depending on your goals. For instance, treating seizures may require a higher ketone level, where as losing weight or improving blood sugar may depend less on the degree of elevation. This chart demonstrates this visually. The numbers below refer to values when testing blood ketone levels.
The keto diet cuts your daily carbohydrates to less than 20 grams; for people with diagnosed diabetes, this may help them manage the condition. A one-year study found that putting people with type 2 diabetes into ketosis dramatically improved their blood sugar control. Also, reports study author Steve Phinney, MD, PhD, chief medical officer of Virta Health, a type 2 diabetes reversal treatment, "Patients were able to lose on average 12 percent of their body weight, about 31 pounds." Doctors want you to know these 13 things about the keto diet.
Over 3 mmol/l is higher than necessary. It will probably achieve neither better nor worse results than being at the 1.5–3 level. Higher numbers can also sometimes mean that you’re not getting enough food (“starvation ketosis”). In people with type 1 diabetes, ketone levels over 3.0 mmol/L can be caused by a severe lack of insulin that requires urgent medical attention.
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