Basic no-cook plates: Away from a kitchen or not wanting to cook for a meal? Sliced deli meats, cheese, and vegetables with dip make an easy lunch. Or boil up a dozen eggs and keep them ready in the fridge to grab for lunch or snacks. A can of tuna or salmon, with some full fat mayonnaise and vegetable crudités, is a simple lunch. Smoked oysters, sardines, herring with raw veggies or a salad are other easy no-cook choices.
This ketogenic meal plan (below 16 g net carbs per day) will keep both your carb intake and your costs down. But don’t worry, your taste buds and your satisfaction won’t be a casualty of lower costs. These meals are far from boring. And they’re filling, too. You won’t be hungry between meals — especially if you are keto-adapted and used to intermittent fasting)!
In general, a low-carb diet focuses on proteins, including meat, poultry, fish and eggs, and some nonstarchy vegetables. A low-carb diet generally excludes or limits most grains, legumes, fruits, breads, sweets, pastas and starchy vegetables, and sometimes nuts and seeds. Some low-carb diet plans allow small amounts of certain fruits, vegetables and whole grains.
In addition to keeping you adequately hydrated -- which can also help alleviate constipation -- drinking lots of water can also help offset still another low-carb diet problem: bad breath. The ketones produced during the diet can lead to what is sometimes described as a fruity odor although it is often described as having an almost "chemical" odor similar to acetone or nail polish remover.
In addition to helping you lose weight, ketosis may also increase your energy, improve your concentration, decrease inflammation and improve your blood sugar markers, reducing your risk of developing diabetes. A study published in the journal Seizure in 2014 also linked ketosis to reduced severity and frequency of seizures in those with epilepsy and a slower progression of Alzheimer's disease.
Low-carb diets may help prevent or improve serious health conditions, such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes, high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease. In fact, almost any diet that helps you shed excess weight can reduce or even reverse risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Most weight-loss diets — not just low-carb diets — may improve blood cholesterol or blood sugar levels, at least temporarily.

In the first few days of the keto diet, it's not uncommon for people to experience the "keto flu," a brief period in which you may have headaches, fatigue, confusion, and nausea. These symptoms are a sign that your body is making the switch from burning glucose (sugar from carbs) for energy to burning fat—a process called ketosis. The changeover can leave you feeling depleted for a day or two, but once you break through to the fat-burning phase, you may find you have much more energy and greater endurance. "You are able to do more without hitting 'the wall,' says Carrie Burrows, PhD, a health and fitness expert. "When we use fat as fuel, our endurance improves and is more sustainable." That extra energy will carry over to your workouts, Dr. Burrows says. Here are more things you need to know before starting the keto diet.
Low-carb diets may improve high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and triglyceride values slightly more than do moderate-carb diets. That may be due not only to how many carbs you eat but also to the quality of your other food choices. Lean protein (fish, poultry, legumes), healthy fats (monounsaturated and polyunsaturated) and unprocessed carbs — such as whole grains, legumes, vegetables, fruits and low-fat dairy products — are generally healthier choices.
There is extensive evidence for the benefit of the Mediterranean style low carb diet, including cutting your risk of heart disease and diabetes. It has even been found to reduce risk the risk of breast cancer, compared with those on a low-fat diet. Consuming extra virgin olive oil (the fresh squeezed juice of olives) seems to be particularly beneficial when it comes to cancer, perhaps because it contains compounds such as polyphenols which are known to be anti-inflammatory.
The ketogenic diet, lovingly referred to as "keto" by most who follow it, is a high-fat, very low-carbohydrate dietary plan whose goal is to change your metabolism. The main objective is to kick-start ketosis, which is a metabolic state where your body burns fat for energy (instead of carbohydrates). While many people turn to the ketogenic diet to lose extra pounds, the benefits of ketosis reach beyond weight loss.
Ketosis has been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties while also assisting with pain relief. Reducing glucose metabolism influences pain, so this could be one potential mechanism of action. In the review The Nervous System and Metabolic Dysregulation: Emerging Evidence Converges on Ketogenic Diet Therapy the authors look at numerous ways that a ketogenic diet can assist with pain and inflammation.
Some studies have shown a positive connection between ketosis and lower levels of ketosis, but as Paoli et all conclude in their paper Beyond Weight Loss: a review of the therapeutic uses of very-low-carbohydrate (ketogenic) diets, there is persuasive, although not yet conclusive, clinical and physiological evidence that the ketogenic diet could be effective in reducing the severity and progression of acne and randomized clinical trials will be required to resolve the issue.

This ketogenic meal plan (below 16 g net carbs per day) will keep both your carb intake and your costs down. But don’t worry, your taste buds and your satisfaction won’t be a casualty of lower costs. These meals are far from boring. And they’re filling, too. You won’t be hungry between meals — especially if you are keto-adapted and used to intermittent fasting)!
One of the most commonly reported disadvantages of a ketogenic diet is constipation. The diet requires you to eliminate most sources of carbohydrates, which also happen to be some of the foods with the highest amount of fiber. As a result, digestion can slow down and leave you feeling uncomfortable, especially in the beginning stages as your body adjusts.
A ketogenic diet – due to its extremely low carb intake – can help address insulin resistance and in turn help with suffers of PCOS. In fact, a pilot study has concluded that a ketogenic diet led to a significant improvement in body weight, fasting insulin, testosterone markets and LH/FSH ratio in woman with PCOS. Two woman even became pregnant during the study.
The keto diet cuts your daily carbohydrates to less than 20 grams; for people with diagnosed diabetes, this may help them manage the condition. A one-year study found that putting people with type 2 diabetes into ketosis dramatically improved their blood sugar control. Also, reports study author Steve Phinney, MD, PhD, chief medical officer of Virta Health, a type 2 diabetes reversal treatment, "Patients were able to lose on average 12 percent of their body weight, about 31 pounds." Doctors want you to know these 13 things about the keto diet.
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